Jerry Martin’s Daybook – Sharing a bit of our lives

Spring was bursting out. My terrific assistant, Laura Buck, who has a daughter in high school, was talking about senioritis, that seductive listlessness that besets students as their summer escape approaches. “I remember it myself,” she said. I don’t. I have a quite different memory.

About a month before the end of the term, I was hit by a car. Driven, of all things, by the daughter of the owner of Rin Tin Tin, star of the silver screen. I had been in the crosswalk of the big parking lot next to the athletic fields. I think she had been checking out the athletes rather than watching where her car was going. She was driving slowly, but fast enough to knock me into the air. Flipped skyward, I remember looking down at the asphalt below. Gravity did its work. An ambulance came. Guys put me on a stretcher. I had remembered from Drivers Ed that they are supposed to put your personal belongings on the stretcher so you don’t worry. Were my guys up to snuff? Yes, there were my school books and shoe, which had flown off, duly resting next to my legs.

I had come down hard and had lacerations on my legs and an acute contusion on my head. Two holes had to be drilled into my skull to drain it. My mother came into my hospital room with a distraught look on her face. I smiled. “Now, Mom, don’t get all shook up!’” She laughed. Her boy was alright.

The owner of the wonder dog was afraid of being sued – that’s what happens to people with celebrity wealth. My family wouldn’t think of such a thing. It was just an accident. No malice, no criminal negligence, a momentary glance in the wrong direction. Rin Tin Tin paid all the medical bills, replaced damaged clothing, and gave me $100 for my discomfort. A hundred bucks doesn’t sound like much but it would cover my McDonald’s tab for the foreseeable future.

The whole episode had been more adventure than trauma. I got a Get Well card signed by all the students in Miss Finley’s Latin class. And it got me out of the end of the term. I didn’t even have to take finals — or resist the lure of senioritis. It was one of the best months of my life!


Assad Hafiz spoke recently on “Hate to Hope: How I Learned to Love the Jews.”  A British-born Muslim, he was on the path to become a terrorist when he decided the first step was to refute the Zionists.  He set out to show all that was wrong with Alan Dershowitz’s The Case for Israel.  He was studying politics and knew how to research the issue. To his amazement, fact after fact stood up to hostile scrutiny.  The books he read on the other side were, he reports, “all emotional.”  They did not answer the facts.  Still, he had heard so much bad about Israel that he decided to check it out for himself.

He went to Israel.  It is a country that has high security.  They could see from his passport that he had visited numerous Muslim countries.  What was he here for?  “I told them the truth,” Hafiz says, “that I had heard terrible things about Israel and wanted to see if they were true.”  They kept him there for eight hours, presumably checking their intelligence sources worldwide to see if there was any dirt on him.  It was boring, but Hafiz understood.  They let him in, and he went all over Israel, talked to Muslims and all sorts of people.

Nothing he had been told was true!  Visiting the Western wall, the foundation of the Second Temple, he learned forward, resting his forehead on the wall.  It came to him:  Without Israel, without Jews, there would be no Islam and no Christianity.  He knew enough history to know that the ideals found here were far superior to the values of the pagan world.  They were the basis for our most cherished conceptions of humanity and its rights.  He had once thought, if Israel is wicked, I should do something about it.  After returning and moving to Canada, he thought that, if the defamation and delegitimization of Israel is wicked, I should do something about it, he started speaking out.  His example was a lesson in itself.

There are great pleasures in wrapping oneself inside one’s own set of ideas and antipathies:  how smart and righteous am I!  It is quite unpleasant to test one’s own beliefs.  This young would-be terrorist had done what few of us ever do:  go read the very best argument against our own point of view.  To do so is a spiritual act.

July 31, 2017


When I had my first divine encounter, I talked to an old friend who advised me to read The Varieties of Religious Experience, a classic by the American philosopher, William James. I read it rather feverishly at the time, as James quotes generously from reports of religious experiences, ancient, modern, and contemporaneous. Moving a stack of books, here was James, and so I picked it up and started reading it again, now in the quieter frame of mind. There is a great deal of scholarly debate these days about the very term, “religion.” It is essentially a modern concept and not one produced by the religious themelves. People immersed in a tradition, don’t call it a “religion,” they call it truth. If they are Hindus, they call it “dharma.” Taoists talk about the Way. James did not have to worry about the latest epicycle of scholarly dispute. He gave the following simple definition: “the life of religion” consists of “the belief that there is an unseen order, and that our supreme good lies in harmoniously adjusting ourselves thereto.” Doesn’t that about sum it up?

July 24, 2017


I believe in taking in truth wherever you find it.  It is an approach that avoids dogmatism and narrowness.  However, I recently was told about the spiritual master who asked his pupils, “Which way would you more likely strike water – by digging one 60-foot well or by digging ten six-foot wells?”  Well, I must admit, I dig ten, a hundred, wells just so far as I happen to get.  The speaker, who has lived a long, rich, full life, said he had dug six 60-foot wells by embracing six different religious or spiritual practices with sufficient depth that, in some cases, he was himself a certified master.  Impressive, but is it necessary?  I am willing to accept that this was his calling, but is it my calling or yours, that is not so clear.  It was certainly not what I felt led to do.  I am inclined not to worry about shallow or deep.  To stay spiritually attuned and you, either way, will probably be in your best comportment toward the divine.

July 10, 2017


This is a day of mourning for me, not that anyone has died. We like happy days, and don’t want sad days, but sometimes sadness is the most meaningful thing of all. I heard unfortunate news about a woman I got to know at an American Academy of Religion meeting. Since she teaches nearby, we had subsequently spent an afternoon sharing experiences, breaking bread together, and visiting the great cathedral of her church. We talked from head and heart. She sent me some excellent pieces she is writing, and we had a possible project in mind. I was surprised that, at the end of the semester, when I e-mailed her to follow up, she did not respond. Nor when I sent another message. I just learned that she has cancer. Don’t know the type or seriousness of it, but one goes stone cold at any mention of the “c” word. There was also another piece of news, not so grave, but saddening nonetheless. Glen Campbell, the country-western singer, has Alzheimer’s. He can no longer play the guitar. Most of these guys and gals, even as they move into twilight years, still have their music, which was always their best form of expression anyway. Instead, Campbell will have the frustration, or perhaps for him it will be more like a longing, for the missing heart of his life. To stay cheerful, one might very well shield oneself from the suffering of others – and, God knows, there is no way one can take it all in – but it seems best to share the setbacks and heartbreak and pain of others, at least enough to keep one’s own heart in tune.


When I was a kid, we visited relatives in Comanche county, Texas, some miles south of Dallas. We visited relatives from my Dad’s side of the family, scattered here and there, farmers mainly, many of whom I had never met before. One visit took us to an old folks home to visit my great aunt Ruth, sister of my grandfather. I had never met someone so old. I remembered her vaguely from earlier childhood, and make a passing reference to her in the God book. She had that extraordinary Christian attitude that, no matter what happens, it is good. A cat would knock over a lamp, shattering it, and she would say, “Praise the Lord” and find some providential meaning in it. On this occasion, she wasn’t up to saying much, but still had a sweet smile. At first, she did not recognize my dad, then she thought he might be my grandfather, but finally it was made clear to her who he was, and she was glad to see him. As they talked, she didn’t seem to track the conversation. One moment didn’t seem to connect with another. Driving back, I thought, “Tomorrow, she might not even remember this visit,” and then wondered, had it been worth our time to come? I decided it had been, not because of some cost-benefit analysis, since the costs were clearer than the benefits, but because of an odd sense that a moment of value has a kind of timeless meaning. It meant something at the moment we visited, that was all that mattered.


I grew up in a Southern Baptist Church. Abigail is Jewish. When I first fell in love, I didn’t know if a sophisticated girl like her could accept a boy born in the Texas Panhandle. It turns out that, as a kid, she had gone to Quaker work camp in the North Carolina hills, and had come to love country gospel, which she listens to each morning as she does her exercises. When I learned that, I knew she was not an uppity New Yorker. Vacationing in a small town in Maine, we went to her country gospel at a local evangelical church that met in a Quonset hut. Abigail had never been to a Christian church. She kept her head down and, indeed, when the preacher got to the Rapture and how all those who not accept Christ would be left behind, she slumped lower in her seat. We made a quick retreat afterwards, but the minister’s wife did manage to shake our hands. Eating at the local diner afterwards, who came in but the wife and a gaggle of ladies from the church. Seeing us, she came over. Abigail told her she was Jewish and the minister’s wife said, with obvious sincerity, “We love Jews!” Having a Jew visit was almost an occasion for celebration. Maybe the Lord told them, as he did Paul, “stop persecuting my people!”


Abigail and I used to spend a week in Maine each summer. The small town was having some kind of parade and, among the activities, was a church group singing beautiful gospel songs. It turns out that they were having a visiting singer, Diane Muse, and so we went to hear her. Afterwards, they greeted us new-comers, as evangelicals do. They mentioned that they knock on doors to spread their message. I gave them my honest advice: don’t knock on doors! Nobody invited you there. People don’t like to be disturbed. Go sing in the park where anyone can linger. They are there voluntarily, and you can speak to them there, give them a pamphlet, and invite them to church.

Sometimes someone knocks on our doors – Seventh Day Adventists some months back and, last week, two young Mormon gentlemen. We were having breakfast and did not welcome the interruption. Nevertheless, I spoke kindly to them. At first, they thought I was a candidate for conversion. They gave me a copy of the Book of Mormon, which I did not own, and which, in spite of many Marriott opportunities, I have never read a line of. I probably should some day. When I made it clear I was not interested in pursuing their faith, they were puzzled why I had been so friendly and forthcoming. I told them that I appreciate anyone who is peacefully living their faith and quietly offering it to others. I wished them farewell, and went back to a very meaningful breakfast with my wife.

May 7, 2017


A friend just sent me this poem by William Blake, which I had not seen before. It alerts us to the human refraction of the divine. It is called “The Divine Image.”

To Mercy, Pity, Peace, and Love
All pray in their distress;
And to these virtues of delight
Return their thankfulness.

For Mercy, Pity, Peace, and Love
Is God, our father dear,
And Mercy, Pity, Peace, and Love
Is Man, his child and care.

For Mercy has a human heart,
Pity a human face,
And Love, the human form divine,
And Peace, the human dress.

Then every man, of every clime,
That prays in his distress,
Prays to the human form divine,
Love, Mercy, Pity, Peace.

And all must love the human form,
In heathen, Turk, or Jew;
Where Mercy, Love, and Pity dwell
Then God is dwelling too.

April 24, 2017


Woody Allen makes a movie every year. Some are funny, some are not. Of those that are not, some are not meant to be. Among these is “Irrational Man.” Allen often pokes fun at great themes in literature – such as “Love and War,” his takeoff on Tolstoy — or parodies of how intellectuals talk about the “deep” thinkers like Freud and Nietzsche and Sartre, where the primal force of life itself, or of radical, arbitrary commitment, thrusts itself against the unfeeling wall of meaningless existence. What is unusual in “Irrational Man” is that these “deep” ideas are given a serious embodiment in a young professor who arrives to teach at a small college, unsettling the place with his bold, radical ideas, the courageous thrust of which makes him irresistibly attractive to a faculty neighbor’s wife and, more dangerously, to a bright-eyed philosophy major already committed to a boyfriend who loves her. While smashing oneself bravely against the shoals of absurd existence may sound heroic, the guy turns out to be a dead man walking. We may not know if all life is meaningless, but this guy’s certainly is. It turns out that preaching about the absurd is not a sufficient reason to go on. He feels he has no reason to do anything. Carrying a hip flask is the only thing that helps. It comes to him that you should murder a guy – shades of Crime and Punishment – and therein discovers a purpose, a reason to live. A new vitality, literally a new virility, courses through his veins. And then … well, I won’t give away the ending, but the young student ends up being the pillar of truth in the movie.

What a break from all those films – which are rife and often considered inspiring – about finding meaning in a meaningless world! Allen reminds us that a philosophy has to stand (and survive) the test of living it out. I had a colleague at Boulder known in her youth for being a bold existentialist. Her daughter was born the same day, in the same hospital, as mine. Over time, I noticed that her philosophical interests had shifted. She no longer taught Sartre. She explained: “Somehow, after I had kids, that stuff didn’t make much sense anymore.”

April 10, 2017


It was one of those out-of-the-blue events that one rarely witnesses personally, up close, in real time – the academic version, in a young man’s career, of winning the lottery. Yet it was unremarked as if unnoticed. We were having a California-eclectic lunch with a good friend of ours, who is a scholar of Indic traditions, and a young man just finishing his Ph.D. Our friend had been the outside reader for the young scholar’s dissertation. Munching nonchalantly, our friend remarked that he is now the editor for a series of books on Indic traditions. “You know,” looking at the younger man, “your dissertation would be ideal for my new series – unless it is also committed elsewhere.” “No, not really.” That was all that was said, all that was needed. The first huge hurdle of a scholar’s career is getting his first book published. In an instant, this young man had been swooped up, carried over, and placed afoot on the other side of this hurdle. He must have been doing “yes!” backflips inside, but outside it was all unremarked, without as much as raised eyebrow or upturned mouth, as lunch and academic life flowed on.

                                                                        March 28, 2017


It was not the time for a conversation. We were all pressed toward the gate, waiting to begin boarding. Abigail and I had been standing for some time when a man looked up and offered her his seat. He looked like a solid, stolid mid-life businessman. I complimented him on his good manners. He owed them to his father, he said. We were talking sideways, attention riveted to the gate, when he turned and looked straight at me for a good long moment. “I have a knack of reading people,” he said. “Could I ask whether you are religious?” Not affiliated, I said, but I do believe in God. He then told me the following story. For years, he had been a drug addict, all-out, non-stop, morning-to-night. Until he died from an overdose. He didn’t give me the clinical details but, while dead, he met God. And he felt God’s love. When he returned to life, he was a changed man – first, he was completely free of addiction, then and thereafter, and, second, he had a new purpose: to always act in a loving way. It was just a brief interaction, then: “Group 3, board now.” And we went our separate ways.

March 15, 2017


“We have to make final arrangements.” Who sez? I have extraordinarily little interest in what happens to my remains, but Abigail likes to have unsettled things settled. She is right, of course. While one does not like to contemplate the moment the screen says “Finis,” setting affairs in order is not so much about death – what can it matter to you after you are gone? – but about life, and the responsible conduct of life. One should not leave burdens to those left behind. They will have grief enough. It is part of one’s living love and care to make arrangements long before they are needed. My parents did this, and my father, who is still alive and well, years ago wrote his own obituary. It begins, “L. B. Martin died peacefully in his bed …” That’s not a bad attitude!

March 9, 2017


We still feel like newlyweds but Abigail and I celebrated our eighteenth anniversary. I still look over every morning and realize what a lucky man I am.

We had thought to view some art in Philadelphia and, weather permitting, visit local history via a carriage ride. Abigail loves horses, but the last one preferred to see her face down flat on the ground. She was complemented for “falling well,” but that is not an achievement to be re-enacted. However, any nearness to a horse is a delight, and a carriage ride provides proximity without risk. However, the woman who does her nails – Hrsha – is from India, and recommended a Hindu mandir near Hamilton, N.J. Better to do something we have not done before, we decided.

Through a gate, we glimpsed the mandir set far back on expansive grounds. The guard, politely but firmly, demanded our purpose for visiting. “To see Krishna,” I said. He bowed with prayerful hands and let us through.

Inside a very large building is what looks like another building, a vast shrine of white marble, carved in detail top to bottom with images of gods and goddesses and the decorative surround befitting them. There was a separate room for worship, and there the showing was to take place. In Hinduism, the god or goddess agrees to be present in a consecrated shrine. Worship consists of darshan, auspicious seeing. At the announced time, a curtain is drawn back, and the god and other holy figures are revealed. You look at Krishna and Krishna looks back. It is a direct encounter with the divine.

In my view, and what I am told in God: An Autobiography, God comes to us in many ways and in many venues. So I take this moment of divine encounter quite seriously. We lingered a good while in reverential silence. Afterwards we drove to the rain to another special encounter, with French food, at a splendid little café in Lambertville, which we approached, if not reverently, at least with the deepest respect.


Two members of our extended family recently suffered the sudden loss of a daughter, of mid-life years, from unknown causes but (here I speculate) possibly a drug overdose. She was a dear, dear girl whose heart had gone out to guys not worthy of her. She may have pulled them up but, over time, they may have done her final, fatal harm. Words fail at such a time, but here is the note I sent to her parents:

We are very saddened at the news of this precious daughter’s life snuffed out so suddenly and prematurely.  It is so very hard to be human, and life is so full of grief and disappointment!  Our hearts go out to the two of you.  [She] is now well, in hands safer than we can provide.  It is the two of you, along with other family, who must bear the burden of loss and of the inevitable second-guessing (if only …).  All God asks of any of us is that we do our best, and our best is not usually THE best, but it is the best we can manage given our own personal resources and limitations.  I love Lincoln’s prayer, “May we do the right as God gives us to know the right …”  I trust [she] did that, as best she could.  Now those of us left behind must do the best we can to find consolation, share our love, and draw wisdom from this tragic moment.  Love from Abigail and me, and blessings to you both!

Rest In Peace, Sweetheart!

February 10, 2107


My friend, Jon Weidenbaum, reminded me of a remarkable scene in a remarkable movie, “The Apostle,” written, directed, and starred in by Robert Duvall. I had seen the movie on Netflix, and it was so good I watched it again with his running commentary, and I watched the interview with him as well.

The film cuts close to my own Texas-Tennessee roots and I approached it with trepidation, not only because of that but because I hear a God voice, and I thought that a movie about a religious fanatic, which is one way to describe the main character, would present him as a nut-case. I am not much of a fanatic or nut-case, but you see the point. I have known from the beginning that every guy on the street corner holding up a sign — “The End is Near” — thinks God is talking to him. I know that logically it doesn’t follow that, because one guy who “hears” God is a lunatic, that all who do so – including Socrates, Joan of Arc, George Fox, and other notables – are mistaken. Still, it is difficult company to be in.

Jon and I were in a discussion where the book of Job came up. Job, a devout man, has suffered unfair punishments and is angry at God about it. He challenges God. The preacher in “The Apostle” also tells God how mad at Him he is. It can be seen on You Tube at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q5v5DOEF45E.

It is a lesson in how to pray. You always have to be honest. No artificial piety welcome. No nicey-nice. Just let it pour out. It can be praise. It can be thanks. It can be an earnest request for guidance. Or it can just be anger, anger that reaches from here to the highest sky, anger that is specific to an instance in which you feel God let you down, or anger that is global, cosmic in scope. It just has to be honest. Then you and God are in relationship. And that is where you want to be.

February 10, 2017


Gosh, do we have a murderer in the family? I always knew that my mother had had a sister, closest in age, who had died, in childhood I assumed, since my mom never said anything else about her. On a visit to my birthplace, Turkey, Texas (northeast of Lubbock), my first cousin Margaret told us that she had been killed. By her husband, so the story goes, who discovered her in a situation that, under Texas mores of the day, justified her prompt termination. He was apparently never prosecuted. I suppose there was a sheriff around but, in my childhood visits to Turkey, I don’t ever remember seeing any evidence whatever of the presence of legal institutions or their enforcement. If there was a sheriff, I imagine him looking like Andy Griffith. I tell the story lightly, since it is distant in life and remote in, well, lifestyle. Hard to take it seriously. Of course, it was deadly serious for her, and the husband, and for the little boy she apparently left behind. Life has some hard edges, very hard indeed.

February 4, 2017


The house I was born in is now an empty lot. The highways – the only paved streets – intersect there. The bare sign of life is a monument in the form of a Texas flag, announcing that the little, windblown town of Turkey is the home of Bob Wills and the Texas Playboys. There is a “shrine” to them down the street.

Until I learned about Mr. Wills, I thought I had a shot at being the most famous person ever to be numbered among its several hundred inhabitants. The town wasn’t much when I was a kid – my cousin Richard would bring me up to date on the population. “The McCardles had twins. Sally Sue ran away with a home products salesman. Old man Smithson died. So it’s now 998.” Today, it is down to a few hundred. Houses I looked for were gone, like missing teeth in an old man’s smile.

One of the largest buildings is still there, now a museum we were able to visit (thanks to its dedicated keeper). It had been THE grocery store, run by my oldest uncle, Calvin, and later a younger uncle, Virgil. The family lived up above, on a wide balcony from which you could look down into the store. The high sidewalk outside was originally wooden, placed at that level so that farmers could hitch their horses to it. They would come into town on Saturday to resupply for the week and then hang around on that veranda and talk politics. I was just a little thing, but I would listen with fascination to their arguments. Everybody was a Democrat – although I have been told that my grandfather was a Republican but didn’t dare let anybody know – but they had strong opinions about which ones were the good ones. When I asked my grandmother, who lived into her 90s, who was the first president she remembered, she reached way back into the nineteenth century – to Grover Cleveland – and she was still mad at him. “Cotton was down to ten cents a bale and he wouldn’t do a derned thing about it!”

I doubt if I will ever need to go back. The town is now more real in memory and imagination than the shuttered stores left behind. Remembrance of things past indeed – yes, our minds have that wonderfully effective capacity!

February 1, 2017


Each time I visit my father, I know this might be the last time I see him. He is ninety-five, pain-free, on his feet (with some unsteadiness now), and enjoys life, however diminished its scope. We last saw him in June and he has noticeably declined since then. I went to the shopping mall to see his buddies there – they are a shrinking group and only two were around – and then to Tai Chi, where, unlike all times past, we just sat and watched.

Dad always loves to talk about old times, particularly meeting my mom, who was eighteen but “looked like a well-developed fourteen-year-old,” their three-week courtship (she was impressed that he know how to milk a cow), acceptance by Mom’s mom (who had had sharp objections to every previous suitor), and the marriage of two high-spirited eighteen and nineteen year olds. When Mom passed away a few years ago, Dad said, “We had 67 years – and it wasn’t nearly long enough.”

On this visit, he told the old stories but in a new key. Before, it was in the spirit of celebration, of relishing the life he had lived and is still living. This time it was retrospective, a summing up or assessment a life in which he had done what he set out to do – to keep his promise to Mom’s mom to take good care of her daughter. Not a bad thing to be doing at this point in his life, but it does have the feeling of ringing down the curtain.

                   January 26, 2017


Star Wars VII reawakened my interest. A couple of years ago, I had rewatched I through VI – a great “exercise” movie for doing my elliptical. There is an interesting spiritual philosophy there, in the mythos of our age. There is view of good and evil, and what theologians call a soteriology, a theory of salvation. In the climactic scene, Darth Vader is ordered by the Emperor to kill Luke, his son. After wavering, Vader turns on the Emperor instead, but suffers mortal wounds in the process. Luke rushes over. “I have to save you, father.” Vader replies: “You already have.”

                                                                      January 10, 2017


I journeyed to Maine with Abigail. I put it that way because this was really her trip and I was “the spouse of.” Her parents retired to a small town where Abigail visited in the summers and formed valuable friendships. I have come to value them as well. They included Sally, head of the theatre program at a major university, a national leader in her field, who was never happier than when in Maine, riding (she had a wonderful way with horses) and sailing (boats loved her too). Alas, Sally passed away some months ago, and part of the meaning the visit was to stitch the hole she left. Most of our visits touched on her in one way or another.

December 29, 2016


two-pathsThe most unusual residential development in Lubbock is a replica of a New England town – upright Victorian houses of multiple colors crowd its narrow streets. The last event of my visit was a chairs-in-a-circle discussion at Town Hall. Mallory (I didn’t catch his last name) was a gracious host and we talked for more than two hours. This was great. Everyone had plenty of opportunity to ask questions about whatever was on their minds pertaining to their spiritual lives. One man had looked rather worried as I made opening comments and I feared that I had said something to offend him, which is easy to do in a religious discussion. However, it was not me but his son that concerned him. The young man was a classics major, interested in theology and in philosophy. He had thought to go to a seminary in Kentucky, but wondered if he should study philosophy instead, since he does not intend to be a minister. It is risky to advise someone you don’t know or, in this case, haven’t even met, but I thought about lives these two alternatives would lead to. One is the narrow path, which would make sense if he had a call to the ministry, but would seem unduly confining otherwise. The other is a broad path, open to all the world’s wisdom, including its greatest religious thinkers. I recommend that he find a program in philosophy that had an emphasis on the philosophy of religion. Steve Balch of Texas Tech recommended that the young man seek advice from Professor Mark Webb of their philosophy department – an excellent suggestion. I wish the young man well!

December 23, 2016


hand-holding-compassI also met with Professor Mark Webb, chair of the philosophy department at Texas Tech, and two grad students from his seminar on the epistemology of religious experience. Since I am an epistemologist and have had a dramatic series of religious experiences, I presented something of a case study for the course. I explained that, within the experience, I found it impossible actually to doubt, however easy it is to doubt from outside the experience. I explained how I had reasoned about it, drawing on William James’s essay “The Will to Believe” and on my version of Pascal’s wager, and then looking at the literature on spiritual discernment. In the seminar, they had been focusing on William Alston’s Perceiving God, the work on religious epistemology I most admire, we had a lot to talk about! They are also keenly interested in what philosophers call the Problem of the Diversity of Revelations: one revelation is a blessing; multiple, competing revelations is an embarrassment. The God book addresses this issue in, so far as I know, a unique way, which is perhaps one reason God came to me.

In passing I mentioned having written an article for a volume edited by Jeanine Diller of the University of Toledo. It turns out that Mark and Jeanine were undergraduates together at Syracuse University! Jeanine read the God book in its long, unedited version, and has been a strong supporter of it.

December 17, 2016


boys-laughingAt Texas Tech, my host Steve Balch always does a one-on-one video with the visiting speaker. Before an event, I usually pray for guidance. What came to me was “have fun.” I thought, yuck it up? No, more like enjoying a conversation with a friend. Since Steve is an old friend, this made sense, and the interview did have a comfortable, conversational feel. He included a great pitch for the God book at the end. It will be posted on the TTU website and made available as a podcast.

December 10, 2016


speaker-croppedMy biggest lecture in Lubbock was at Texas Tech itself. My host was Steve Balch, who directs a program on Western Civilization and whom I have known for many years. He was one of the first people who read the long, unedited form of the God book. A skeptic himself, Steve commented, “If there is a God, this is what he sounds like.” Steve did find the book to be a page-turner and gave me a great introduction. I appreciate an audience with all sorts of people, one that includes folks from the town as well as students and professors, including at least one from the Christian university across town. I talked about the impact of the purely quantitative scientific paradigm and questioned whether it provides us with a sufficient horizon of values and purpose for living meaningful lives and sustaining civilization. Questions were lively and pointed. One was about free will – are we really agents or just the pawns of impersonal forces? Another was about whether a commitment to individual liberty tended to create an atmosphere of tolerance so extreme that it precludes judgments of right and wrong. As I signed books afterwards, I was interested in talking to each person about their story. These are quite meaningful exchanges that I cherish.


finger-of-god-to-smartphone1The first question at South Plains Community College was about the impact of social media on religion, not a question I had previously asked myself. Given the unbearable lightness of twitter chatter, the prognosis was not good. Only subsequently did it occur to me that the great spiritual leaders were really masters of great one-liners. “In the Beginning, God created the heavens and the earth.” “Blessed are the poor, for they shall inherit the earth.” “The Tao that can be said is not the true Tao.” “The Atman is Brahman.” Would those works as tweets?

I had intensive talks with several students and a couple of the faculty members. My giving a talk about my experiences gives others an opportunity to share theirs. One of the professors described her own quite serious spiritual journey. I felt guided to do something I had never done before – simply to put my hand on her head. I was reluctant – it might be felt as intrusive or seen as theatrical – but I did as guided, asking her if I could place my hand on her head. She bowed slightly. It felt electric. “You have great spiritual energy,” I said, though unsure what those words exactly meant.

November 20, 2016


eastern-state-universityYou meet such amazing people when you travel! At Eastern New Mexico University, one somewhat older woman arrived only toward the end of my talk but stayed through the discussion and later. We had a great talk with this extraordinarily accomplished lady. She is a biologist and was involved in the early DNA research of James Dewey Watson and others. One of the main research teams was in Germany, where she worked for several years. Hers has been a life of intellectual adventure, taking each ride as it was offered. Now, among other things, she teaches World Religions and does so with capacious knowledge and sensibility.

Our host, Steven Brust, the chair of the political science department, was amazing in a quite different way. He is, I am told, a serious Catholic, who provides intellectual and moral support to those students who can be so beleaguered in a modern secular university. I am not a Catholic but, even in my agnostic days teaching at Boulder, I saw the problem. Students would see their faith not only challenged intellectually but ridiculed and make the butt of jokes. Somebody needs to give them some philosophical karate to defend themselves and provide a positive role model of an intelligent, well-educated, believing person. Steven does that.

I happened to mention my participation in the Eric Voegelin Society. Lo and behold, Steven did his dissertation with David Walsh, a leading Voegelin scholar and, as it also happens, one of the first persons to whom I confided my encounter with God. It’s a small world!

November 18, 2016


scales-judgment-intellectI have Christian friends who talk as if the whole point of salvation is to stay out of hell. Jesus becomes a free “Get Out of Jail” card. But, while I was given images of heaven, hell is never mentioned. What I was told is that judgment takes place at every moment. Are we doing the right thing or wrong? Are we becoming better persons or worse? Are we moving closer to God or farther away? There is an afterlife, but final judgment is not its purpose. It is the vertical dimension, the upward, Godward orientation of our lives that counts. We should ask each day, each moment, am I becoming more loving, more responsible, more honorable, or less? Am I doing what, as far as I can tell, God would want me to be doing? Do that, and the after life will take care of itself.

October 30, 2016


lightningOne of the first times I ever shared my encounter with God publicly was in a talk to a meeting of the American Academy of Religion. The following speaker, Mikhail Sergeev, who teaches philosophy and religion at the University of the Arts in Philadelphia, was also chairing the session. He was so struck by what I told that he waived his presentation to allow more time to discuss my experience. Subsequently, he became a great reader of God: An Autobiography, and a friend. He generously gave me a book, The Rose of the World, by a Russian who had experiences similar or parallel to my own, including an vision wider than the frame of any one religion. The book influenced him greatly, Sergeev told me. He explained that he was half-Jewish and half-Russian, and had easy familiarity with both religions but was never quite at home in either one. That left him with, he said, “a marginalized self-consciousness” and “inner tension.”

“I was raised in the Soviet Union and communist ideology provided an umbrella identity for me that unified my dualist self-identification. When this ideology collapsed for me personally in 1984, I was faced with the choice to replace it with something equally unifying, but religions I turned to were both extremely archaic and very isolated from each other.

The Rose of the World was like lightening in the sky to me because it was contemporary, highly sophisticated and provided a model for ‘religions without borders.’ I still believe that the separation of religions is an artificial construct and does not reach heaven.”

Indeed, the God who speaks to me spoke to Moses and to Jesus, and also to Gautama (known as the Buddha), the Hindu seers, and people back to our earliest ancestors. The project I was told to undertake, Theology Without Walls, is an effort to comprehend the fullness of divine reality. God: An Autobiography records how God led me through the sacred texts of many religions and guided me to see a larger story. Perhaps this is part of what God meant when he told me, “You stand on the threshold of a new spiritual era, a new axial age.”

October 17, 2016


old-handMy 95-year-old dad is no fool, and he is quick to be suspicious, sometimes to a fault. A wonderful nurse named Elena visits once a week officially to put ointment on his legs but unofficially to look around and see if there is anything she can help with. Recently, she started scooping up his dirty clothes and said she was going to take them to the cleaners. “No, leave my things alone,” my dad said. So she put them down and quietly moved on.

The following week Dad did not want to let her in. “You tried to steal my clothes.” She explained about the cleaners but he was still suspicious. “Mr. Martin, I would never steal your clothes.” He looked at her, wondering why he should believe her. “They wouldn’t fit me!” He stared at her for a moment and then started laughing. “No, I guess they wouldn’t.” And they were friends again.

October 8, 2016


hearthandsI suppose some people feel they are the center of all attention, of all interest and gossip and buzz, but I am the opposite. I wear a veil of anonymity, or so I imagine, and Abigail is rather like me. But it isn’t also so. Recently we attended a bittersweet going-away party for the “founding father” of our condo. A couple who used to live here returned for the occasion. At one point, the wife pulled Abigail aside. “I have read your book,” she said. Abigail just looked at her. She hasn’t published a book for years. “What book?”  “A Good Look at Evil” was the answer. Not only has she read it, she has shared it with others, leading to many interesting discussions. A nice thing for an author to hear. Who knew anyone was reading that out-of-print book?

As I write in the God book, I fell in love with Abigail on the phone. She called for help with an issue at her college. It led to a big fight, reported in the New York papers. It was only after the fight was over (we won) that I met the Deputy Mayor. “We followed that fight with great interest,” he told me. The Mayor’s office had been on our side! If I had only known it at the time — they could have been helpful. Still, it was nice to learn that we had had a cheering section. Perhaps it would be better to assume that, sometimes at least, others are paying attention, are cheering for us, and to count on their silent support.

September 23, 2016


candlesI have many readers in India and sometimes hear from them, but none more frequently or profoundly than Ajit Dass in Lucknow. He is precisely half way around the world. So I was surprised to hear from him in New Jersey. “Could we have lunch?” “Yes, indeed!” He and the friend with whom he was staying were students together at India’s M.I.T., not an environment that encourages one’s spirituality. Nevertheless, Ajit started studying the writings of spiritual masters and relating them to truths in mathematics. In this context, he came across the God: An Autobiography website, and started a conversation there with me.

Over lunch, I told him he was now my ambassador to India, the emissary for the God book. I gave him an inscribed copy, and two signed copies to pass on to individuals of his choosing in India. “And then they will be ambassadors!” he said. Just so. I have received the assignment to bring this book to the public, and I cannot succeed alone. I can’t be the only messenger; I have to trust that others will do their best to spread the word. A review of the God book appeared, in of all places a motherhood magazine. What could the reviewer possibly find there that could be relevant to her readers? The book has a great message for our children, the reviewer said, that each of us is an ambassador from God. Yes, indeed.

September 13, 2016


paintbrushA faithful life ends and continues. Finishing a 35-year ministry, a local pastor we know just preached his last sermon, “Life Lessons.” One of the lessons was this: Rather than asking God to help us in our work, we should just let ourselves be instruments in God’s work. Sometimes God calls us out of our comfort zones – that is frequently true in his own ministry, he said. He is a quiet, bookish sort in a ministry that is anything but quiet or bookish. He feels called to do missionary work in India, training pastors there, in conditions that are quite uncomfortable. His message was certainly relevant to me, a deep introvert who must do radio and television, a modest person who must insist on the importance of what God has told me, someone who would prefer never to be noticed but must now make sure he is noticed. I would guess that the pastor’s message is relevant, in different ways, to all of us.

September 7, 2016


toolsIn the Big Apple, Abigail and I had lunch with Jonathan Weidenbaum, one of my colleagues in the Theology Without Walls project at the American Academy of Religion. Jon is a young man of crackling energy and wide, nothing-human-is-foreign-to me interests. He and I come to religious matters by very different routes, but we share something quite important. Neither of us is inclined to gloss over the rough edges of the world or to think that our main job in life is to leap out of the world. There is work here to be done, and we are God’s partners in getting it done. We contend against what Jon calls the “No” at the heart of the reality or what God characterized to me as “the world’s guilty resistance.”

August 30, 2016


PergamonPergamon was a great city of the ancient world, a regional capital built by Alexander the Great‘s successors. Abigail and I transported ourselves back to that time, via an exhibit at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. There we saw a magnificent city – another Athens or Rome spread out across adjoining hills near the eastern shores of the Aegean Sea. There they all were: Alexander, Homer, Demosthenes, , and  (including one, none of whose plays have survived), not stylized and unreal, but as if they could start talking to you at any moment. Behind the intellectual life of this city of philosophers and mathematicians was an aesthetic, a sense of form and balance. The Greeks were fascinated by ratios and equations, the mathematics of musical scales and harmonies and of visual perspective. “Nothing in excess.” Everything in precise proportion and equipoise. Abigail wondered, if Hegel is right that a civilization falls because of its own inner contradictions, how could this civilization of perfect consistency and completeness disappear? I don’t have an answer to that, but it is striking that Greece had the most unconvincing religion of all the great cultures – a rich mythology but not gods who commanded conviction, a stand-in perhaps for something more real.

August 25, 2016


Earlier I wrote about barbequeMark Groleau, who interviewed me for his podcast series.  As we discussed obedience to God, he told me about the odd incident I reported.  He had headed off to buy the BBQ of his dreams but, as he neared the exit to the store, he received the strong sense that he was not supposed to buy it.  He obediently turned off and went back home.  In the God book, I talk about my experiencing similarly “pointless” divine commands early in my experience with God.  Recently, I heard from Mark again.  There is more to the story.

“Last Thursday I cut the audio for our conversation (which was released TODAY on Toronto radio and will be up in 2 weeks on my own podcast site) – and was particularly reminded about how I still don’t have a BBQ or an answer to why I might have heard God say not to buy one.

“Well, last Thursday evening a friend came over for a drink – he’s in the middle of a painful separation from his wife and they’re dividing their stuff moving out. Well into the evening, he says, ‘I don’t know what to do with my stuff. For example, my BBQ. I love that thing; it was a gift and I can’t just get rid of it. But I’m moving into a condo. I can’t take it. I’d love someone to take it off my hands.’ I almost dropped my pipe. He had no idea I didn’t have a BBQ; he assumed I did. I fell over myself feeling I’d be happy to. Could barely get the words out. The very day I reheard our conversation about the BBQ, my buddy offers me his BBQ, bono.

“And so now, there it sits on my deck, a testimony to patience, listening to God, and how delighted my buddy is that I didn’t have one of my own yet. Because I turned the car around that day.

“Thanks, Jerry… still impacted by our conversation, my appreciation of you, and telling everyone. :)”

A friend who is in deep grief, having recently lost his wife, asked me whether the God of the universe could possibly care about his individual suffering.  Well, if God can care about Mark’s BBQ, His capacity for caring must have much greater bandwidth than it is easy for us to imagine.

August 19, 2016


man on benchAt 95, my dad cannot always find the right words, or any words, for what he wants to say, and he can forget half-way through a sentence where he was going with it. But it is a very great blessing that he has not suffered personality distortion, which can happen. He is still the reasonable, self-contained, good-humored, down-to-earth guy he always ways. Having breakfast with him in California recently, a lady at another table spoke up across the room, looking at me: “You look like my son-in-law!” I was surprised that dad, who is impossibly deaf, heard her. But he leaned over to me: “Tell her ‘he must be very handsome.’”

August 13, 2016


binocularsGary Goldberg has had a fascinating spiritual journey. He is the host of “In the Spirit” on WPRI in upstate New York. His father was Jewish and his mother Catholic. To marry her, he had to agree to raise the kids in the church. Young Gary went through the full course of religious acculturation , like a wick repeatedly dipped in tallow to make a candle. All the time, he says, he was seeking God, searching for a personal relationship with the divine. But he did not find it there. Today he best relates to the divine through sitar music, meditation, and the bhakti tradition of Krishna, whom he loves. But, like the best finders, he remains a seeker, always looking for a deeper, more encompassing life with God. I have another friend, raised Catholic, who remains so. She does find God there. But she too remains a seeker, and tells all her friends about God: An Autobiography. Some people find God in the faith they were born into. Some find God elsewhere, sometimes “anywhere but” their childhood religion. Neither group has the advantage over the other. God is happy to meet us where we find Him.

August 8, 2016


girl-thinking-sunIt was nice seeing my granddaughter, Kelsea, in San Diego. She was full of reflections on her first year at college. She loves her sisters in the sorority. They have helped her get through the troubled times – events like a car crash in the midnight fog as well as the pressures and down days that are part of college life. She described the accident, which totaled her car, and then asked, “What did I learn from the experience?” She seems to ask herself that question after every significant event, a remarkably thoughtful way to live. She tended to blame herself for the accident, even though it was really just one of those things that happen when cars can’t see each other. She tends to blame herself for everything, she said, and this was an opportunity to counter that tendency. Her sisters were really there for her, for which she was deeply appreciative, and this made her want to be present for them and other friends when they had trouble. I don’t remember being thoughtful in this way when I was her age. Life is more complicated these days, and I guess young people have to engage in more complicated lifemanship. If Kelsea is an example, some are succeeding.

August 3, 2016


Empty Spinning Merry-go-roundAbigail and I visited my daughter Claire and her family in San Diego. She has married a guy, Dave, a solid citizen with whom she is much happier than when she was single and raising a child alone. Claire and her husband now have a second child, the seven-year-old Alex. He is willful and irrepressible, and has more energy than he well knows what to do with. They have done the right thing – they have him in Cub scouts, Little League, racing little hand-made cars, designing vast buildings on his computer, and I forget what else. All that energy is being routed to power up a purposeful life. Good for him, and good for them!

July 29. 2016


The Kirkus review is finally out.  Theman reading book reviewer finds God: An Autobiography to be “a captivating religious dialogue for the modern age,” written in “an immensely readable prose.”  Wow!  I am pleased not only at the high marks, but at the careful attention the reviewer gave to reading the book and writing about it concisely and elegantly.

Like many reviewers, this one tends to assume that I am the author of the God who speaks to me:  “His portrait of God is a remarkable dramatic construct …”  Another favorable reviewer calls it a “non-fiction novel.”  In fact, the events related in the book actually happened.  God’s words are literally what I was told in prayer.  I do not fault others for assuming that this is a literary device of some sort.  How would they know it is not?  And, in some ways, the distinction may not matter.  But, for me personally, it is crucial.  I would not have given up a great career to write a book about my own spiritual philosophy (which I didn’t even have).  I have followed the guidance to do so because I believe it comes from a higher source.  And, in part because of what God tells me in this book, I have come to believe that everyone who pays attention has cues, prompts, intuitions, and epiphanies from that higher source.  I hope that my experience will help readers become more open to their own.    Read Review : CLICK HERE

July 24, 2016


heatwaveWhen Abigail and I were in Phoenix, the sun baked down at slightly over 100 degrees.  Residents, who enjoy the illusion that this desert is habitable, take the summer heat as a feature not a glitch.  But, as we were leaving, there were warnings for the next day that it was going to get REALLY hot, well over 110.  Just standing in the sun with an uncovered head too long would be life threatening.  Yet this is now one of the ten major metropolitan areas.  The world made possible by irrigation and air-conditioning.

July 19, 2016


clock with second handA few months ago, I was at the drugstore.  I had a prescription and they had the medication.  But they couldn’t give it to me.  The computer was down.  I could have dropped dead waiting.  There is a great old movie, made by Orson Welles, called “The Magnificent Ambersons.”  The film opens with the narrator explaining, as we see and hear horse-drawn sleighs at Christmastime, the temporal setting.  Our story takes place before all these speedy devices (such as the automobile that is about to make its appearance, driven by a very enthusiastic young man) and people had plenty of time.  These days, people count time by the seconds?  What’s wrong with this picture?

July 12, 1016


frustrationHas something gone wrong with us?  We landed in California, tired from airplanes, Arizona highways, and the bright lights of publicity, so we decided on an easy schedule the next day to refresh and muse.  We just needed to contact people to confirm next week’s various gettings-together, including with Dad’s caregivers and his lawyer.  Then disaster.  No internet!  Then internet, but no email.  Would Abigail be able to do send her weekly column?  Frantic calls to our techno-helpers back home.  No responses.  We don’t even have phone numbers for some of the people (who calls, anymore?).  Come evening, a helper calls back.  Try this.  Try that.  What is our password?  It’s by my desk back home.  Finally, the helper – the wonderful Sharon Brebner – cracks the code.  We can breathe again.  Life moves on.  We are connected to the world.

July 6, 2016


grouphandsWhen we headed for Arizona, I asked Pat McMahon, host of the TV program we would be doing, who else I should get to know while I was in Phoenix. He put me in touch with Anne Taylor of the Arizona Interfaith Movement. The ARIFM includes 22 different faith groups, more than I even knew existed in this barren state, whose main residents until recently had been cactus and rock. It turned out that their council was holding its last meeting of the year the evening we would be in town, and Anne squeezed me into the program.

What an amazing group it was! People from all these traditions who have been meeting for 25 years and learning how to get along and work on projects together. But something deeper was taking place. They had not merely come to “understand” one another. They were drawing spiritual insight from one another’s different perspectives. Each was learning that God – the divine reality by whatever name – is larger than a single tradition, and yet, amazingly, is still the God one has always known, in more familiar terms, in one’s own tradition.

June 30, 2016


TruthAnother first: Abigail and me on TV. Pat McMahon is a broadcasting legend in Arizona – an award-winner in news, comedy, and talk shows, now host of a weekly radio show called “God talk” and a daily TV show called “Morning Scramble.” He did my first radio interview ever, and there was never a better one. On radio, I had an hour; on TV, only five and a half minutes. Pat did a great intro: “This is a show where we bring on top names, and what name could be better than God? And who better to talk to than the guy who has a two-way line to God?” I said a little about the book, up to when the Voice announced, “I am God,” and then Pat asked Abigail, “Why did God pick your husband?” An interesting question, one no one had asked before. “I have known two truthful people,” she answered. “One was my father and the other is Jerry.” She went on from there. That sounded good to me, and to Pat too, I think.

June 26, 2016


heart-leaf

Another first for me: speaking at a church. Interestingly, an “interfaith” church. (I didn’t know they had those.) Members had already been told the gist of the book: it is about what God told the author in prayer. I chatted with this one and that one before the service began. “God talks to me all the time,” a wonderfully sincere woman said. “It can be just the light falling on the leaf in a certain way.” Just so. Another taught me how to hug “heart-to-heart.” I dropped the part of my talk designed to mitigate skepticism. These folks would be open.

There is much in the book that would have fit the 16 principles posted on their website, but when I prayed beforehand, I was told, “Tell them what they don’t know.” So I spoke to the unasked question: What is all this – interactions with human beings and all – like for God? We ask God to understand our every hurt, but we show little empathy for divine suffering. And God surely suffers.

I was right. They were open-minded and open-hearted. Many questions came, some penetrating to rather complex issues in the book, issues I was not quite prepared to explicate. I had not fully come to terms with them myself, I suppose. That’s what meaningful discourse is like.

June 22, 2016


pebbble-pathGary Goldberg has had a fascinating spiritual journey. He is the host of “In the Spirit” on WPRI in upstate New York. His father was Jewish and his mother Catholic. To marry her, he had to agree to raise the kids Catholic. So, like the wick dipped in tallow repeatedly to make a candle, young Gary participated in all the liturgies, training, and acculturation that belongs to that tradition. All the time, he says, he was seeking God, searching for a personal relationship with the divine, and he did not find it there. Today he best relates to the divine through sitar music, meditation, and the bhakti tradition of Krishna, whom he loves. But, like the best finders, he remains a seeker, always looking for a deeper, more encompassing life with God. I have another friend, raised Catholic who remains so. She does find God there. But, again like the best finders, she is still a seeker, and tells all her friends about God: An Autobiography. Some people find God in the faith they were born into. Some find God elsewhere, sometimes “anywhere but” their childhood religion. Neither group has the advantage over the other. God is happy to meet us where we find Him.

June 16, 2016


sun through clouds

Whether, when it is seen from the other side, death is a tragedy we do not know. But, from this side, it certainly is. In a recent talk, I was asked by a woman in the audience about our loved ones who have passed away. Are they okay? It happened to be a lady I know – a widow whose husband passed away more than ten years ago. One day I asked her if it had gotten better, any easier to live with. No, she said, it gets worse. Like a homesickness, the yearning grows stronger with time. Now she was asking this question from the audience. What could I tell her? How do I know? All I could report is that I was given three visions of the afterlife. They are not identical, and I left all three in the book – how could I adjudicate between them? I think they can be reconciled, but I leave that to readers to decide. However, I think I could say one thing about all three visions: Those who have passed before us are okay.

June 13, 2016


kiss

My dad doesn’t remember what he did yesterday, he is full of stories from earlier in life. I have heard them often and sometimes, in the retelling, I learn something new. When he was 19, he met my mother at a dance. She was really cute but looked too young. She was nearly 18, “close enough.” Three weeks later, he asked her to marry him. She agreed, and he thought to ask her father. “What if he says no,” he asked her. “Then I won’t do it.” “So I won’t ask him.” They went off to find the preacher. He had already gone to bed but his wife waked him, and he performed the ceremony. Afterwards, he and mom started “messing around,” as he puts it, and it was time to “get a room.” Dad had always been what they called “wild,” risking illegality and dispute. But he stopped to make a phone call. Her parents would worry. They didn’t have a phone so he called the gas station across the street. “Please go over and tell Mrs. Young that her daughter is married.”

June 10, 2016


Since the God book is the first book I have ever written, I keep having first-ever experiences. I was invited to do what they call a “reading” of a portion of the book. Most of the readers and audience were poets, both known and unknown. Much of my book is intellectual – I put question after question to God. But poets, while thoughtful, work from their feelings and intuitions. I read several short sections from the God book, and included the passage about how my personal feelings of shame from childhood, which I wore on my forehead in the form of a prominent crimson birthmark, a mark of Cain. I still cannot read that chapter and revisit those feelings without a hint of tears. It was somewhat painful, almost embarrassing, to read out loud, but the good poets, sweet souls themselves, nodded as I read.

June 5, 2016


People holding hands at sunsetI gave my first-ever talk at a church. As I report in the God book, I was told not to affiliate with any particular religion or denomination. The content of the book itself seems to be Christian-plus, but also Jewish-plus, Hindu-plus, and so on. It is a conversation with “God of Israel” and also the “God of All.” The “plus” makes people nervous, since religions usually claim to be not just the truth, but the only truth. They see their rivals not as only mistaken in this and that, but as paving the highway to perdition. However, my experience has not confirmed that worry. Evangelicals, mainstream Protestants, and Catholics (a priest, no less) have had me on their radio programs. What God has told me relates directly to their concerns as well, and they have often invited me back. Even to skeptics and atheists, to my surprise, find something in the God book that speaks to them. I looked  forward to this first churchly talk, and will report on it shortly.

June 1, 2016


Holding HandsMy dad just turned 95. He lives independently in California – 3000 miles away. I called to wish him a happy birthday. “Congratulations, Dad. How does it feel to be that old?” “I don’t feel a day over 94,” he replied. He is pain-free and on his feet. We will visit him soon, and I will go to the mall to walk with him and his buddies, and then to Tai Chi where we have the pleasure of seeing the shapely leader, Pat, whom we call simply the Pretty Lady. Dad still has an eye for the ladies. George, his financial advisor, called and told me that Dad needed a new calendar. I sent him THE special issue of Sports Illustrated. “Thanks,” Dad said, “I have enough beautiful women to last the rest of my life.” Which, hopefully, has a long way to go still.

May 29, 2016


youngmessiahsmallAbigail and I saw “The Young Messiah.” It is one of several religious-themed movies that have been making the theatre, some good, some not so good. This one is based on a novel by Anne Rice – yes, the vampire novelist, but recently she has written two or three Bible-oriented movies.

We know very little of Jesus’ childhood. At the age of 12, he is reported to have been found expounding scripture, to the amazement of his elders in the synagogue. The movie draws from stories in apocryphal literature that do not have scriptural standing but fill in missing pieces, real or speculative, of Jesus’ story.

Imagine, if you can, what it was like to be Jesus, put yourself in his sandals, and ask yourself: What is it like to be born divine, as son of God (however your theology defines that)? As a one-year old, do you know you are God? That doesn’t quite sound right. Does it come to you much later, in a single stroke, while, for example, being dipped in the river by John the Baptist? Or, as this movie speculates, do you begin to notice that you are not quite like the other kids. You seem to have wisdom beyond your years and a soothing, even healing, touch. That is closer to the version I received, which is reported in the book. This slow dawning of divinity underscores the human side of Jesus, which is hard to keep in mind when thinking about so ethereal a figure. But, if you think about it, this simple humanity of Jesus is probably essential to his ability to connect us to his Father, whom he addressed in the familiar way, as abba, best translated as “papa.” The movie nicely shows us this side of the young Jesus.

 May 25, 2016


people on stairsWe watched “Downton Abbey,” the final season. People have told us that, when it is over, you miss it as if you and they have suddenly moved away, never to see each other again. Abigail and I were wondering what gave it that grip on its viewers. It is, of course, well-written, staged, and acted. But that is just the label on the box; what are the actual ingredients? It attaches us to the extent that the characters are attached to one another — Bates and his wife, the sometimes obtuse Lord Grantham and his understanding wife, Carson and “Mrs.” Carson, Lady Edith and her daughter, and others who befriend one other when a friend is much needed.

But the network of attachments does not account for the difficulty of leaving it behind. What is crucial is the longitudinal setting – it is a family and societal epic of stability and change. The old is elegant, reliable, and authoritative. The new is inelegant, unreliable, and dashes authority to pieces, necessarily so – we can all see that – but there is still something to mourn in the passing of the old, even if outdated.

So much of life is like that. I left Boulder over thirty years ago, and yet in some ways that town and campus still seem like home and, well, there are no friends like old friends. My years in Washington, D.C., a beautiful and exciting city, were full of adventure and discovery and, though I no longer need those adventures, I miss those friends and the purposes that brought us together. My life has moved on in new and much better ways, but the Rocky Mountains still loom above the Boulder campus and the Washington Monument still presides over the nation’s capital.

May 22, 2016


“Don’t go to the BBDog fetchQ place!”  That was the divine message received by Mark Groleau one day, just as he was nearing this destination.  Mark is the host of the Toronto-based podcast, WikiGod, on which I was guest.  There was no apparent reason for the command, then or since.  But he obeyed.

There was a time, early in my adventure with God, that I was receiving numerous “pointless” commands – and doing them.  Doubting whether these could really be from God, I was guided to a certain book in a bookstore.  Opening it, my eyes fell upon the words addressed to God by the people of Israel when they accepted the covenant:  “Everything You have commanded, we will do.”

I was being given a training in obedience, like spiritual boot camp.  Perhaps Mark was being given training, or a test.  If so, he passed.

May 16, 2016


cameraI have been doing a lot of radio interviews on the book, and a couple of television programs (via Skype). The challenging, and interesting, part is that every host is coming from a different place. They have their own beliefs and commitments, and they get uncomfortable and even argumentative if the book says something that sounds different. I have no interest in being argumentative. I am not trying to persuade anybody of anything. My only job is, as God told me, to be “a serious reporter of what you are told in prayer.” My only credential is that I am an honest guy who is telling the story straight. Whether they believe it is up to them.

May 12, 2016


wheat

I am, as perhaps you are, older than I used to be – not superannuated (my father is still alive, after all) – but I certainly have more mileage on my tires. I only read War and Peace a couple of years ago. Its length and forbidding title had held me back. It is puzzling as a novel because the dashing character who looked to be the hero dies long before the end. But two other young pairs do find one another and so there is some satisfaction in that. But, instead of “they lived happily ever after” with the scene fading into twilight pastels, the narrative skips along to their middle years. What we see there is the quiet life of married couples, “stouter and broader,” living out the duties, constraints, and quiet pleasures of marriage and children. The critic George Steiner, whose little book on Tolstoy and Dostoevsky I am just reading, finds the characters “old and dismal” and laments their “sad metamorphosis.” I thought, oh yes, this was Steiner’s first book. He was young and full of life’s promise. There is nothing wrong with that, but promise is only Possibility, yet to be actualized into anything real. It is easy for Possibility to be dazzling. But Actuality consists of the hard grain of life. It has its challenging curvature, shaped by duties and routines — that are not, however, without their own quiet ecstasy.

                                May 9, 2016


man staring starsThere are elaborate arguments from design – that the organized universe could not have come about without a master intelligence — based on probability theory and the like.  They are impressive but always left me cold.  My own sense of the meaning of the universe starts littler than that, and more from the bottom up.  We have purposes built right into our nature that seem to have a divine trajectory, and purposes that emerge in our lives in cooperation or constructive conflict with those we affect.
​In an effort to make up for my poetry deficiency by reading a little here and there, I came across lines by Robert Frost.  He says he studied the sky to see if the universe

“had the purpose from the first

To produce purpose”

I like that simple formulation.  The larger purpose of the whole is precisely to provide the wherewithal for the littler purposes that make up your and my lives.

May 5, 2016


dandelionsAbigail and I participate in a Dialogue Group consisting almost exclusively of Christians and Jews.  Last time I brought a copy of the book and briefly told the group that I had had conversations with God.  There was a feeling, I thought, of polite discomfort.  Why wouldn’t there be?
​We gave a ride home to a Southern Baptist pastor, a very fine man dedicated to a set of scriptures that do not invite further revelations from God.  Nevertheless, he did not doubt that God was contacting me.  He seemed to have arrived, from a very different starting point, at a view similar to my own – that God calls each of us in God’s own way and does not give us all the same assignment.  As the Good Book says, “The spirit blowethwhere it listeth.”

April 28, 2016


heart-538009_960_720Wow, reviews – great reviews – have already appeared on Amazon.com! Most are by people to whom I sent galleys. Some are by “Anonymous” so I can’t be sure. Since the ones I know are people for whom I have great respect, I am humbled. Since I feel an obligation to get the word out, so that God wasn’t wasting his breath in talking to me, I am also grateful for their help. But, really, I mean really, readers have posted wonderful comments. I can’t claim much of the credit, since God wrote 80 percent of the book, but at least my smaller part didn’t spoil the whole!

April 22, 2016


hands-600497_640One thing we all have to guard against is the idolatry of belief, not only in religion but in politics and other areas as well. However we come to our beliefs, we tend to hold them tightly once we have them. I recently ran across the following statement by the great intellectual historian James Harvey Robinson: “We are incredibly heedless in the formation of our beliefs, but find ourselves filled with illicit passion for them when anyone proposes to rob us of our companionship. It is obviously not the ideas themselves that are dear to us, but our self-esteem which is threatened. Most of our so-called reasoning consists in finding arguments for going on believing as we already do.”

Sometimes the very most spiritual people, who in some ways have the most open souls, latch themselves onto a tightly chorded set of beliefs, and anathematize anyone who finds a different spiritual path. The world may be divided into Seekers and Finders, but the best Seekers are those who have some glimmer of the divine, and the best Finders are those who continue to seek.

April 18, 2016


Surprised to find myself in a little Twitter debate with Nicholas G. Hahn, editor at RealReligion.com. In a piece of mine just run at his site, “The Soul of an Animal,” I reported I had been told in prayer that “each animal has a distinctive personality, its own soul.” If animals have souls, why shouldn’t they have an afterlife? http://bit.ly/226keFy

Mr. Hahn tweeted that this was “bad eschatology.” My response was,

@NGHahn3 Every pet owner knows that Fido has a unique personality and a soul worthy of heaven! 

It turns out that Mr. Hahn had published, “Puppies, Prayers, and a Political Menagerie,” Nov. 19, 2015, in the Wall Street Journal trying to rebut Christians who believe animals have souls, in connection with some policy issue.
Here it is: http://on.wsj.com/23z3nBh

I was not a party to that dispute, but I am happy to speak up for pets and their souls!

What do you think, friends?

I’d be honored to have you join me on my new Twitter adventure @godanautobio

April 14, 2016


book-623163_640My guidance in the morning was to take some time off, so Abigail and I went to a late afternoon showing of “God Is Not Dead 2.”  The movie dramatizes the sense of harassment many in the religious community feel.  In a class about King’s and Gandhi’s commitment to non-violence, a student asks, “Isn’t that what Jesus taught?”  The teacher says yes, citing Jesus’ injunction to “love your enemies.”  The school board throws the book at her, leading to a courtroom drama about secular authority versus beliefs of conscience.  After which Abigail and I ate at Perkins and, over “San Francisco Grille,” discussed the many issues it raised.

April 13, 2016


“Days of Our Lives”

When I was a kid, I was fascinated by history and politics. Probably more for my sake than their own, my parents made the long trek from California to Washington, D.C. We picked up my grandparents in Tennessee along the way. We would start out early each day and try to log as miles as possible before having to stop. Each day’s journey stopped sharply at 3 pm, when we quickly checked into a model with a working television set, so my grandmother could watch a serial – perhaps it is still running – called “The Days of Our Lives.”

With our own lives, we are not always so gripped. One day passes into another and, if a friend asks, we might exhale “same old, same old.” My wife Abigail writes in her journal every day, not only to give due and thoughtful attention to the lessons of that day, but to have a record of her path through life. Memory distorts and rearranges the past to accommodate the present. This happens in the history of a nation, and it happens in the life of an individual. I know because I kept an occasional journal for a year or so in grad school. On those rare occasions I decide to toss detritus from my past, I come upon those journal pages. It is shocking to see those unvarnished, unsmoothed-out comments from days past. I wasn’t quite the same person back then.

Currently, my life is far from routine, and one day is not like the last. That poses a different problem – of time whizzing past, without record or reflection – threatening, as it moves into memory, to become little more than a blur. I have not stated that quite correctly. I am the sort of person who is always reflecting – that is the temperament of a philosopher. But the reflections themselves come and go. Who knows what I was pondering, what insights and failures of insight I was having a year ago, or even last month.

Hence this Daybook, which is also a kind of one-sided conversation, as if we were both whittling sticks on the front porch, and one talking and the other taking it in. Maybe making a comment now and again, which you are welcome to do here, and start a bit of sharing our lives with one another.

April 4, 2016


I saw the book on Kindle for the first time. The print edition will take about a week longer. I am not the sort of person who whoops and hollers that my book is now published. It is not, after all, “my” book. About 80 percent of the words came verbatim in prayer. I was the assembler, editor, introducer, and what Biblical scholars call “the redactor.” (Did you ever wonder who put all the books of the Bible into their final form? That is the redactor, and for the Old Testament, it is thought to be Ezra.)

So I am not so much an author relishing seeing his name in print, as a messenger who got a critical communication delivered intact and on time. I am grateful I had the strength and the helpers who have come to me providentially. I will need other helpers to get the word out. Then I will take a break and await new orders.

March  28, 2016


Abigail and I have been celebrating her birthday – all month. Why should someone have only a single day to be special – can’t we stretch it out a bit?

I didn’t know what to give her, so I asked her. She had had her eye on a necklace in a catalogue – I ordered it, it came, and it does look good on her!

Abigail is Jewish but loves Bible movies, not just “Ten Commandments” and other Old Testament movies, but Jesus movies too. Two are in the theatres now. So we went to see “The Risen” and then out to the kind of dark restaurant designed for romantic occasions. We also went to “The Young Messiah” with dinner and comparing reactions to the movie afterwards.

Month-long celebrations are a great idea – everybody should do it. In fact, Abigail doesn’t know it, but I celebrate her birthday in my heart every day – over our talkathon breakfasts, and when we snuggle down at the end of the day to catch a Netflicks movie, and each morning when I look over and see her curled up in my bed. In Hebrew, Abigail means “father’s joy.” In English, it means “Jerry’s joy.”

March 25, 2016


Abigail and I and my “creative director” Jessica Cortes drove over and met with our publicists for the first time. My “business director” Laura Buck had emergency mom duties that grounded her.

Smith Publicity, Inc., is a national firm, with HQ in Cherry Hill, N.J. (which is nearby, on the map at least, not in the traffic patterns), Los Angeles, Toronto, and perhaps other places. Our lead publicist is Sarah Miniaci, who is so delightful that I told her that, if I were a producer she called to pitch Jerry Martin, I would say, “Forget Jerry Martin, I’d rather interview you!” The person who actually makes most of the calls Mallory Campoli, who is a dear and has the wonderful quality of persistence, which stops just short of irritating her targets, she assured us. It was great to meet her in person for the first time and a chance to take her flowers, which were almost as splendid as she is.

Generously, the CEO Dan Smith, who built this successful company from scratch, joined us. Instead of the brief meet-and-greet we expected, we talked about different aspects of book, from the point of view of reader and public interest.

March 18, 2016


Don’t ever write a book. The proof-reading is a killer. My whole team and I – there are six of us, counting me — went over one version after another and correcting typos, misspellings, and a host of more subtle errors. These would be corrected and another galley sent for our examination. We would find more mistakes! And do it all again, and then, darn, still mistakes. I was ready to get done with it, but everyone on my team insisted, “This book is going to be around for a long time — it has to be done right.” So we went over it again just to make sure. I think we finally got it right, but I saw a blog post that posed the question, “Has any book ever been published without any errors?” Maybe this book will be the first!

March 5, 2016


One thought on “Jerry Martin’s Daybook – Sharing a bit of our lives

  1. Antony Reply

    Thank you, nice read.

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